The Wonder Worker by Susan Howatch

This is one of those books I would want with me if trapped on a desert island. The Wonder Worker has many levels, and is one of those wonderful stories that you return to again and again, always finding something new in the words. On the surface level, it's a story about four everyday people … Continue reading The Wonder Worker by Susan Howatch

A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness

I realize I am late to the party with this book, but seriously, I only "discovered" A Discovery of Witches, and forgive my cheesy-ass pun, when the Sundance Channel started airing the previews for the TV series based on the book trilogy. The series looked so well-made that I had to read the book and … Continue reading A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness

The Dead House by Billy O’Callaghan

What I found fascinating about The Dead House is the fact that it's narrated in first person by a character who is not the focus of the story, but whose own story is as much a part of the overall arc as the main character. Mike is an art dealer and his best friend is … Continue reading The Dead House by Billy O’Callaghan

In the Company of the Courtesan by Sarah Dunant

Happy New Year! To start off 2018, I take us back to Venice, dear readers. But it's not the Venice of dreams and watery, lyrical descriptions. This 16th-century Venice, elegantly depicted In The Company of the Courtesan, is a hard, rough place, stinking of rotten canal water and fish, and is as often the deathplace of … Continue reading In the Company of the Courtesan by Sarah Dunant

The Unburied by Charles Palliser

Charles Palliser is my favorite author after Umberto Eco, writing as he does in the most lucid, erudite, intellectual and bawdy style that sucks you into the vivid, dirty, and virulent world of Victorian, post-Industrial England. His settings are the traditional British country house or vicarage, manor or townhouse, and his Dickensian-named characters show off the … Continue reading The Unburied by Charles Palliser

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

In terms of medieval books, The Canterbury Tales is right up there with Dante's Inferno as my top favorites. Unless you're a trained medieval scholar, however, I would strongly recommend reading a more modern English translation of the book, since the medieval English of Chaucer is quite difficult to read. The entire book essentially revolves … Continue reading The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

It took me awhile to read this book, though it had been recommended by numerous friends and fellow bloggers. There are some seriously good food mentions in this book, which is partly why I read it three times. Also, it's just an addictive read. The gist of the book is thus: As a teen, Theo … Continue reading The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

Thanks to TB for the photography. Do you know what it's like to read a book and have it haunt you, like a whisper or the faint hint of perfume in an empty room? I've always been possessed by the gorgeous Gothic-ness of Rebecca, which has mystery, ghosts, passionate love and a big, haunted house. … Continue reading Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

Dune by Frank Herbert

Thanks to JP for the photography. I remember discovering the planet Arrakis when I was about 11 years old and nosily poking around my uncle Greg's apartment. He lived in a guest apartment behind my grandparent's house and had a taste for the music of The Police and sci-fi fiction, both of which he passed … Continue reading Dune by Frank Herbert

The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen

Thanks to AL for the photography. Being a sucker for fairy tales, The Snow Queen is a particular favorite. I remember reading it as a little girl and being fascinated by the oh-so-foreign Northern European world of Gerda and Kay, the two children in this tale, though I'd forgotten there are several small backstories that … Continue reading The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen