Ode to Tomatoes (A Poem) by Pablo Neruda

I don't know about you, but I've never been big on poetry. The rhythm and meters necessary to appropriately read poems just bog me down. I love hearing poetry read by someone who understands how it should be enunciated, but when I try to read poetry, either in my head or out loud, I sound … Continue reading Ode to Tomatoes (A Poem) by Pablo Neruda

The Last Temptation of Christ by Nikos Kazantzakis

In honor of Easter Sunday, I decided to reacquaint myself with The Last Temptation of Christ, a book that has a very soft spot in my heart. This is the book and movie for which I was kicked out of Catholic school back in 9th grade. I didn't get kicked out because I was a … Continue reading The Last Temptation of Christ by Nikos Kazantzakis

Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky

An interesting microcosm of history, Salt essentially takes us back through the known history of the world, and analyzes how this humble little rock - the only rock humans can eat - and how it has had a transforming effect upon civilization. To be honest, however, there were large chunks of the book that weren't … Continue reading Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky

The Apprentice by Jacques Pépin

There are three celebrity cooks  - Anthony Bourdain, Nigella Lawson and Emeril Lagasse - whom I love, but who are as much shrewd self-marketers as they are cooks. Then there are the three honest-to-God gourmet chefs whose writings have heavily influenced my own cooking and writing. Julia Child, the Goddess; Clarissa Dickson Wright, of Two … Continue reading The Apprentice by Jacques Pépin

Homme Fatal by Paul Mayersberg

While digging through my bookshelves the other day, I came across Homme Fatal, a pop fiction novel I'd bought years ago and held onto because the story was so fascinating.  Though quite a smutty novel, I primarily held onto it because the story, told about the same events from two viewpoints, had a sleazy, 1940's … Continue reading Homme Fatal by Paul Mayersberg